Interviews

Life Worth Living with Miroslav Volf and Ryan McAnnally-Linz

Life Worth Living with Miroslav Volf and Ryan McAnnally-Linz

What does it mean to live a fulfilling life? Initially a class in Yale’s humanities program, Life Worth Living sought to find answers to the age-old philosophical question: what’s the meaning of life? Sharon talks with Yale professors and two of the authors behind the book, Miroslav Volf and Ryan McAnnally-Linz, about their work, which brings the classroom lessons to a new audience. Learn how to go beyond TikTok and Cheetos, and find true fulfillment.

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  • Host: Sharon McMahon
  • Executive Producer: Heather Jackson
  • Audio Producer: Jenny Snyder

Guests

Guests

Miroslav Volf

Miroslav Volf, Matthew Croasmun, and Ryan McAnnally-Linz teach the most in-demand course in Yale College’s Humanities Program: Life Worth Living. Students describe the course as life-changing, and preliminary analyses by an outside researcher show strongly significant effects of the course on students’ sense of meaning in life.

Volf is the Henry B. Wright Professor of Theology at Yale Divinity School and director of the Yale Center for Faith & Culture, and was awarded the 2002 Grawemeyer Award in Religion for Exclusion and Embrace, which was named one of the one hundred most influential religious books of the twentieth century.

Ryan McAnnally-Linz

Miroslav Volf, Matthew Croasmun, and Ryan McAnnally-Linz teach the most in-demand course in Yale College’s Humanities Program: Life Worth Living. Students describe the course as life-changing, and preliminary analyses by an outside researcher show strongly significant effects of the course on students’ sense of meaning in life.

McAnnally-Linz is the associate director of the Yale Center for Faith & Culture. He is a coauthor with Volf of The Home of God and Public Faith in Action (Brazos), a 2016 Publishers Weekly Best Book in religion, and has written for The Washington Post’s Acts of Faith, Sojourners, and The Christian Century.